I've got mail from MyPostcard

Scanning hit for the future of postal services and customer experience

I’ve been working on a bit of research about the future of mail and couriers. One of the coolest bits of research I found is MyPostcard.

MyPostcard is actually a scanning hit for a trend I’ve been following for a hospitality company. The hospitality industry has been focused on customer experience, experience design, and the role tech plays in curating these experiences. Especially with luxury brands, the success is in the details.

People are buying tailored suits. They are buying more hand-made products. Bespoke products and services are the leaders at the moment. Customers are wanting concierge service from personal butlers. There are modern accommodations that are treating the staff like servants from an upstairs/ downstairs drama. Nostalgia is a key driver, but so too is the desire for high-quality, personalized experiences that technology just doesn’t quite deliver.

MyPostcard is a perfect example of how tech can enable and even drive this trend. First, the app for Android or Apple has a great user experience. It’s easy to upload images, write text, and even sign the card.

You can choose from postcards, greeting cards, XXL greeting cards, or photo prints. You can also order them in bulk. The XXL cards are very cool. I sent two to my parents in the states from here in Hawkes Bay, New Zealand. They print photos of the kids all the time, but the cards of our own design featuring photos of the kids and the kids’ signatures/ drawings gave them a special thrill. It was an inexpensive gift that will pay dividends in maintaining relationships between my parents and their grandchildren. My kids love the postcards I sent them too. The app is so easy, even my parents have learned how to use it and send some to my kids.

This is the kind of experience that is both nostalgic and modern. Although society is still pushing toward being completely paperless for all the bills and correspondence that used to flood the mail services, customers still need mail and courier services. This need is expected to continue until Amazon Prime Air can handle all of our delivery needs. By then, it will be the United States of Amazon, right? Until then, little touches like these will add value to personal relationships, client relationships, etc.

I should also include that businesses have long offered personalized cards and gifts. Moonpig is one example that has offered online orders since their launch to deliver anywhere in the world. However, MyPostcard is less expensive, and it has a much easier and pleasant UX. MyPostcard offeres the typical greeting card templates if that’s what you want, but their focus is on sharing your images and helping you create your own card from scratch.

I’m working on a more professional post, but I wanted to share my unique code. If you want to try out MyPostcard, enter my code, TVHESH, after creating a new account. You’ll get $3 and I’ll get $3 too. It’s a great way to stay in contact with people.

I've got mail from MyPostcard
I’ve got mail from MyPostcard
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Scenarios for Disaster Preparedness

Previous articles in the series addressed the concepts of implementing strategic foresight, conducting horizon scanning, imagining black swans, and mapping existing systems. Now, we’ll look at developing scenarios upon which to base strategies for disaster preparedness.

The Future is Unwritten

The most important thing to remember is that the future is unpredictable. Yes, there will be patterns and trends that may continue into the future. However, patterns and trends can always change course, and the effect they have on everything else can also change.

Read the rest by clicking here.

Environmental and Horizon Scanning for Disaster Preparedness

I published another article with Prepare with Foresight. This one describes horizon scanning and environmental scanning and how they can be used for disaster preparedness. I compare them to an extended version of situational awareness.

Here’s the intro:

In my previous post, I explained how individuals can benefit from strategic foresight. Now, I’ll dig a little deeper into how to actually do that. Environmental and horizon scanning are like the ditch digging, prospecting, or burger flipping of strategic foresight because they are tediously essential to everything else a futurist does. These two terms are easily confused and often considered the same thing by experts. I distinguish the two because it helps me focus on their different purposes.

Environmental scanning is about looking at past and present events to understand the current state of a nation, industry, organization, etc. This should only need to be done once in a while as needed. Horizon scanning, on the other hand, is about looking for changes that may affect the future and should be done on a regular basis—daily, weekly, or at least monthly.

Finish reading: http://www.preparewithforesight.com/horizon-scanning/

Using Strategic Foresight in Disaster Preparedness

I have just started a new series are Prepare with Foresight about what strategic foresight is and how it can be applied to contingency planning and disaster preparedness.

What is the most important tool in your survival kit? Is it the tins of food, the can opener, the gun, the bullets, the gas lamp? Your most important tool for surviving a disaster is the same as for thriving in a safe, modern world: your brain. However, that tool is only as useful as the whetstone with which you sharpen it. The full name of this website is ‘Prepared with Foresight’, but to date, most of the posts have been about preparation and less about foresight. So, let me introduce you to the most important tool in my own mental toolbox, strategic foresight.

Read the rest at Using Strategic Foresight in Disaster Preparedness

It’s World Futures Day! Celebrate now

The Association of Professional Futurists (APF) will commemorate World Future Day 2017 with an experiment in crowdsourcing an ode to the future. This will run from midnight, 12:01 AM , UTC+14 MARCH 1st to midnight 11:59 PM UTC-11. Thomas Jefferson once said. “I like the dreams…

via Commemorate World Futures Day: Speak Future #SPKFUTR — Association of Professional Futurists #spkfutr

It is World Futures Day, and the APF is commemorating it with a Twitter chat poetry slam as the link above describes.

The Millennium Project is holding its annual video chat on Google Hangouts.

  1. World Future Day — March 1 —  join futurists from around the world in a 24-hour conversation about the world’s potential futures, challenges, and opportunities. The online dialogue will start at 12 noon in Auckland, New Zealand and move across the world ending in Honolulu at 12 noon. You can connect to the Hangout session at: MP-FuturesDay2017

See more here:

AROUND THE WORLD IN 24 HOURS: WORLD FUTURES DAY

This post is a promotion for World Futures Day hosted by The Millennium Project, press release. Also, be sure to join the APF as we host a Twitter chat poetry slam on the future. So, first click here https://goo.gl/4hCJq3 and then click here:   Around-the-World 24-Hour Conversation on the Future to Celebrate World Future Day March …