Join me at Block to the Future in Brisbane

BLOCK TO THE FUTURE Friday 27 – Saturday 28 October 2017 BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA If you haven’t registered yet for our Block to the Future event in Brisbane, now is a great time. We have created a few pages to highlight the event, https://apf.org/gatherings/block-to-the-future/. On there, you will see links at the top to the schedule…

via Block to the Future in Brisbane — Association of Professional Futurists

I’m looking forward to attending this event next week. It will be a great time to network with colleagues and learn more about applications for blockchain technology. This will be my APF event since 2009.

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Scenarios for Disaster Preparedness

Previous articles in the series addressed the concepts of implementing strategic foresight, conducting horizon scanning, imagining black swans, and mapping existing systems. Now, we’ll look at developing scenarios upon which to base strategies for disaster preparedness.

The Future is Unwritten

The most important thing to remember is that the future is unpredictable. Yes, there will be patterns and trends that may continue into the future. However, patterns and trends can always change course, and the effect they have on everything else can also change.

Read the rest by clicking here.

A Butterfly Flaps Its Wings in Asia

Writing about strategic foresight in plain language was certainly more difficult than I expected. However, I finally feel like I can write my foresight book. I have a topic, and at least five of the chapters will be based in large part on these articles–without all the disaster preparedness stuff of course. However, that book is also in the works. Also, keep an eye out for the last article about scenarios.

Here’s the intro:

In the first article, I introduced strategic foresight as a tool for optimizing your disaster preparedness. In the second article, I introduced horizon scanning as the most basic method of gathering information for strategic foresight. And in the third article, I explained the reason why it is important to consider everything as possible, and to challenge your assumptions. In this article, I discuss the concept of the world as a complex system, touching on the fields of Systems and Chaos Theory.

Finish reading: http://www.preparewithforesight.com/butterfly-effect/

Black Swans and Other Cliches

My articles for Prepare with Foresight have been focused on communicating strategic foresight in very everyday language. I’m not always convinced I’ve stripped my writing of academic or professional jargon without patronizing my audience. However, strategic foresight is not enough of a household concept yet to be able to communicate it without a little jargon.

Here’s the intro:

Not everyone remembers where they were when the stock market crashed or when Trump was elected the US President. However, many people around the world remember where they were and how they felt when the attacks happened on September 11, 2001. My two previous posts have introduced strategic foresight and how some of its tools and methods can help you better prepare for the unexpected. Now, let’s dig a little deeper and look at different types of scenarios such as Black Swans.

Finish reading: http://www.preparewithforesight.com/scenario-awareness-black-swans/

Environmental and Horizon Scanning for Disaster Preparedness

I published another article with Prepare with Foresight. This one describes horizon scanning and environmental scanning and how they can be used for disaster preparedness. I compare them to an extended version of situational awareness.

Here’s the intro:

In my previous post, I explained how individuals can benefit from strategic foresight. Now, I’ll dig a little deeper into how to actually do that. Environmental and horizon scanning are like the ditch digging, prospecting, or burger flipping of strategic foresight because they are tediously essential to everything else a futurist does. These two terms are easily confused and often considered the same thing by experts. I distinguish the two because it helps me focus on their different purposes.

Environmental scanning is about looking at past and present events to understand the current state of a nation, industry, organization, etc. This should only need to be done once in a while as needed. Horizon scanning, on the other hand, is about looking for changes that may affect the future and should be done on a regular basis—daily, weekly, or at least monthly.

Finish reading: http://www.preparewithforesight.com/horizon-scanning/