Scenarios for Disaster Preparedness

Previous articles in the series addressed the concepts of implementing strategic foresight, conducting horizon scanning, imagining black swans, and mapping existing systems. Now, we’ll look at developing scenarios upon which to base strategies for disaster preparedness.

The Future is Unwritten

The most important thing to remember is that the future is unpredictable. Yes, there will be patterns and trends that may continue into the future. However, patterns and trends can always change course, and the effect they have on everything else can also change.

Read the rest by clicking here.

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A Butterfly Flaps Its Wings in Asia

Writing about strategic foresight in plain language was certainly more difficult than I expected. However, I finally feel like I can write my foresight book. I have a topic, and at least five of the chapters will be based in large part on these articles–without all the disaster preparedness stuff of course. However, that book is also in the works. Also, keep an eye out for the last article about scenarios.

Here’s the intro:

In the first article, I introduced strategic foresight as a tool for optimizing your disaster preparedness. In the second article, I introduced horizon scanning as the most basic method of gathering information for strategic foresight. And in the third article, I explained the reason why it is important to consider everything as possible, and to challenge your assumptions. In this article, I discuss the concept of the world as a complex system, touching on the fields of Systems and Chaos Theory.

Finish reading: http://www.preparewithforesight.com/butterfly-effect/

Black Swans and Other Cliches

My articles for Prepare with Foresight have been focused on communicating strategic foresight in very everyday language. I’m not always convinced I’ve stripped my writing of academic or professional jargon without patronizing my audience. However, strategic foresight is not enough of a household concept yet to be able to communicate it without a little jargon.

Here’s the intro:

Not everyone remembers where they were when the stock market crashed or when Trump was elected the US President. However, many people around the world remember where they were and how they felt when the attacks happened on September 11, 2001. My two previous posts have introduced strategic foresight and how some of its tools and methods can help you better prepare for the unexpected. Now, let’s dig a little deeper and look at different types of scenarios such as Black Swans.

Finish reading: http://www.preparewithforesight.com/scenario-awareness-black-swans/

Using Strategic Foresight in Disaster Preparedness

I have just started a new series are Prepare with Foresight about what strategic foresight is and how it can be applied to contingency planning and disaster preparedness.

What is the most important tool in your survival kit? Is it the tins of food, the can opener, the gun, the bullets, the gas lamp? Your most important tool for surviving a disaster is the same as for thriving in a safe, modern world: your brain. However, that tool is only as useful as the whetstone with which you sharpen it. The full name of this website is ‘Prepared with Foresight’, but to date, most of the posts have been about preparation and less about foresight. So, let me introduce you to the most important tool in my own mental toolbox, strategic foresight.

Read the rest at Using Strategic Foresight in Disaster Preparedness

It’s World Futures Day! Celebrate now

The Association of Professional Futurists (APF) will commemorate World Future Day 2017 with an experiment in crowdsourcing an ode to the future. This will run from midnight, 12:01 AM , UTC+14 MARCH 1st to midnight 11:59 PM UTC-11. Thomas Jefferson once said. “I like the dreams…

via Commemorate World Futures Day: Speak Future #SPKFUTR — Association of Professional Futurists #spkfutr

It is World Futures Day, and the APF is commemorating it with a Twitter chat poetry slam as the link above describes.

The Millennium Project is holding its annual video chat on Google Hangouts.

  1. World Future Day — March 1 —  join futurists from around the world in a 24-hour conversation about the world’s potential futures, challenges, and opportunities. The online dialogue will start at 12 noon in Auckland, New Zealand and move across the world ending in Honolulu at 12 noon. You can connect to the Hangout session at: MP-FuturesDay2017

See more here:

AROUND THE WORLD IN 24 HOURS: WORLD FUTURES DAY

This post is a promotion for World Futures Day hosted by The Millennium Project, press release. Also, be sure to join the APF as we host a Twitter chat poetry slam on the future. So, first click here https://goo.gl/4hCJq3 and then click here:   Around-the-World 24-Hour Conversation on the Future to Celebrate World Future Day March …