A Butterfly Flaps Its Wings in Asia

Writing about strategic foresight in plain language was certainly more difficult than I expected. However, I finally feel like I can write my foresight book. I have a topic, and at least five of the chapters will be based in large part on these articles–without all the disaster preparedness stuff of course. However, that book is also in the works. Also, keep an eye out for the last article about scenarios.

Here’s the intro:

In the first article, I introduced strategic foresight as a tool for optimizing your disaster preparedness. In the second article, I introduced horizon scanning as the most basic method of gathering information for strategic foresight. And in the third article, I explained the reason why it is important to consider everything as possible, and to challenge your assumptions. In this article, I discuss the concept of the world as a complex system, touching on the fields of Systems and Chaos Theory.

Finish reading: http://www.preparewithforesight.com/butterfly-effect/

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Black Swans and Other Cliches

My articles for Prepare with Foresight have been focused on communicating strategic foresight in very everyday language. I’m not always convinced I’ve stripped my writing of academic or professional jargon without patronizing my audience. However, strategic foresight is not enough of a household concept yet to be able to communicate it without a little jargon.

Here’s the intro:

Not everyone remembers where they were when the stock market crashed or when Trump was elected the US President. However, many people around the world remember where they were and how they felt when the attacks happened on September 11, 2001. My two previous posts have introduced strategic foresight and how some of its tools and methods can help you better prepare for the unexpected. Now, let’s dig a little deeper and look at different types of scenarios such as Black Swans.

Finish reading: http://www.preparewithforesight.com/scenario-awareness-black-swans/